Marcia C. Inhorn, PhD, MPH, is the William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Anthropology and International Affairs in the Department of Anthropology and The Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale University. A specialist on Middle Eastern gender, religion, and health, Inhorn has conducted research on the social impact of infertility and assisted reproductive technologies in Egypt, Lebanon, the United Arab Emirates, and Arab America over the past 30 years. She is the author of five books on the subject, as well as nine edited volumes. Inhorn is the founding editor of the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies (JMEWS), and co-editor of the Berghahn Book series on “Fertility, Reproduction, and Sexuality.”

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Announcements

Cosmopolitan Conceptions: IVF Sojourns in Global Dubai, Duke University Press, August 2015.

Dubai is an emergent global city and a new medical tourism hub. This book explores the reproductive travel of infertile couples seeking assisted conception in Dubai’s in vitro fertilization (IVF) sector. Conceive, the cosmopolitan clinic featured in this volume, delivers high-quality, patient-centered IVF across national, ethnic, religious, linguistic and cultural boundaries to its many incoming travelers. Yet, cosmopolitan clinics such as Conceive are rare within the global landscape of IVF. Reproductive travelers are often fleeing home countries where IVF services are absent, inaccessible, illegal, or harmful. Cosmopolitan Conceptions challenges the term “reproductive tourism” as the appropriate descriptor for IVF-related travel across national and international borders.

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Robert B. Textor and Family Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology

Marcia C. Inhorn is this year’s recipient of the 2015 Robert B. Textor and Family Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology, a prize awarded by the American Anthropological Association. As noted by the AAA committee, “The Robert B. Textor and Family Prize was awarded primarily for Inhorn’s book, The New Arab Man: Emergent Masculinities, Technologies, and Islam in the Middle East (Princeton University Press, 2012). The New Arab Man makes a groundbreaking contribution to the study of masculinity and health by focusing on men’s reproductive health and men’s use of reproductive health technologies within the context of primarily Islamic cultures of the Middle East (and of Middle Eastern men who have immigrated to the United States).

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